Sacred Rivers Carbon Project: Rivers as the nexus to reverse climate change at scale and advance social justice

Thursday, November 7, 2019 – 1:15 to 2:15 PM EDT Click here to download the slides 
The Sacred Rivers Carbon Project utilizes Hivemind’s cutting edge mycelium technology to create carbon banks within critical watersheds throughout Southeast Asia. These sites can help reverse catastrophic climate change and also prevent habitat and biodiversity loss, clean up air and water pollution, and provide local economic development that creates jobs and can empower women. The projects will be sustained and scaled through the sale of carbon credits. Watch the Security and Sustainability Forum for a one-hour discussion with Hivemind and Sacred Rivers CEO Joseph Kelly, VP of Marketing Kylie Brown, and arborist Michael McCord about their regenerative agriculture work in Southeast Asia, the benefits planned for the local population and funding needed to launch the program at three pilot sites in 2019. Joseph also updates us on HiveMind’s business development since he was last on an SSF program in the Spring of 2019.

If you’re interested in getting information about the Sacred River Carbon Project investment opportunity, please email Joseph for details: josephkelly@beetechhive.com

Joseph Kelly, Executive Director

Joseph Kelly has a twenty-five-year track record launching socially engaged companies at the intersection of culture, environment, and health. He gave a TEDx Talk on HiveMind’s work using mycelium to bioremediate dozens of radioactive sites successfully in the Southwest.

Michael McCord, US Arborist & Biome Designer

Michael McCord, US Arborist & Biome Designer

Mike McCord is the founder of Community Foodscapes, a permaculture-focused edible landscape design firm in Atlanta. He was a food forest ranger with Trees Atlanta, responsible for planting and maintaining a dozen different biomes on the City of Atlanta’s Beltline as well as community education and outreach. He also worked in Uganda, setting up community gardens with the University of Georgia Office of Sustainability.

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